China’s Terracotta Warriors to Enter New York City

Standing more than six feet tall and weighing 600 pounds each, the terracotta soldiers were created more than 2,000 years ago with unprecedented craftsmanship to protect China’s First Emperor, Qin Shihuangdi, in his afterlife.

After founding the first united China, Qin Shihuangdi was responsible for building and unifying various sections of the Great Wall of China and a massive national road system that has continued to evolve over centuries.

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Terracotta Warriors: Defenders of China’s First Emperor, a new immersive exhibition of one of the most significant archaeological discoveries in modern time, is set to make its Northeast U.S. debut in New York City at Discovery Times Square (226 West 44th Street) on April 27.

The exhibition will feature artifacts dating back to 221 BCE, including the world premiere of a set of gates from an ancient Han burial chamber, the U.S. debut of more than 20 artifacts, and an up-close look at 10 of the authentic, life-sized clay soldiers and their armor.

Since its accidental discovery in 1974, the Terracotta Army continues its legacy as one of the most sought after collections of artifacts from ancient China.

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The exhibition created and produced by Discovery Times Square in partnership with China Institute will provide a unique way of understanding China’s history, says Discovery Times Square (DTS), which is New York City’s exhibition center presenting visitors with limited-run, educational and immersive exhibit experiences.

The exhibit contains three chronological exhibition stages. Upon entry, visitors will first learn the history of the Qin Dynasty and the First Emperor’s rise to power, followed by the significance of the Terracotta Warriors, and the peaceful life of the ensuing Han Dynasty, which established essential Chinese traditions still reflected in Chinese society today.

In addition to the Terracotta Warriors and burial chamber gates, more than 200 additional artifacts and treasures will be displayed, including a bronze ritual vessel “He” (water or wine container), a “Lai” Ding (cooking utensil), and gold pendants and ornaments.

Founded in 1926 by a group of American and Chinese educators, China Institute in America is a bicultural non-profit organization in the U.S. to focus exclusively on China.

RMN News

Rakesh Raman