Heidi Klum Prefers Diet Coke for Heart Health

Diet Coke and Heidi Klum joined forces on February 1 to raise awareness and funds for women’s heart health education and research. February is American Heart Month, and for the fourth consecutive year, Diet Coke is partnering with the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to support The Heart Truth campaign. 

This year, Diet Coke has created a national game of “Capture the Flag,” inviting people to visit DietCoke.com/HeartTruth where they can capture flags with a click of the mouse to trigger a donation from Diet Coke to heart health programs.

Heidi Klum and Diet Coke launched the campaign at an all-star, first-of-its-kind “Capture the Flag” game in Los Angeles.

[ Also Read: Do You Have a Fun Idea for Pepsi? ]

Two teams faced off at the University of California, Los Angeles’ (UCLA) Drake Stadium. The teams were playing to raise funds for two heart health organizations: UCLA Preventative Cardiology Program and the University of California, Davis Women’s Cardiovascular Medicine Program.

 

“Capture the Flag is such a fun game, so when Diet Coke asked me to join the team, I was in!” said Klum. “It’s simple for anyone to participate: go online, capture a flag, and you’ve raised money. Capture more flags. Raise more money. It’s that easy.”

Chelsie Hightower, Natasha Bedingfield and Ryan Kwanten were also on the sidelines along with the Laker Girls to support the teams and the cause.

[ Also Read: What to Do When Heart Attack Strikes ]

“We’re dedicated to encouraging new generations of people to be active, stay extraordinary and become advocates for heart health,” said William White, group director, Coke North America.

Diet Coke will be hosting “Capture the Flag” games in Atlanta, Austin, Boston, Chicago, Columbus, Seattle, and Washington D.C. 

Through these games, the launch event in Los Angeles, online “Capture the Flag” program and a special partnership with SUBWAY restaurants, Diet Coke will be donating over $300,000 to local heart health organizations in February. 

[ Also Read: What Celebs Do to Keep You Healthy ]

Diet Coke is also bringing the “Capture the Flag” campaign to consumers in stores. For the second year in a row, Diet Coke has released limited-edition cans and bottles in recognition of American Heart Month. 

This year, the packages feature a stylized stick figure waving a heart flag in support of The Heart Truth. In addition to these limited-edition cans and bottles, more than six billion packages of Diet Coke will continue to carry The Heart Truth logo to raise awareness of women’s heart health year-round. 

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Moreover, Diet Coke will continue to spread The Heart Truth message through national television and digital advertisements. The advertisements will animate the heart flag graphics from the limited-edition Diet Coke cans and bottles. 

National television ads will be seen by viewers watching “American Idol” and The Academy Awards. Digital ads will be featured on Web sites such as People.com, Glam Media sites and via a Social Vibe game.

RMN News

Rakesh Raman

  • http://www.facebook.com/David.Stephen.Williams?ref=tn_tnmn David Williams

    Don’t you realise that Aspartame & thus “Diet” drinks are toxic killers?
    “Back in 1990, the National Institutes of Health began funding a long-term study of stroke and cardiovascular risk factors among of urban adults. Known as the Northern Manhattan Study and housed at Columbia University, the project enrolled thousands of people from the community and subjected them to medical testing while recording their food consumption habits.

    Among its results, a surprising one has emerged (recently published paper available here): People who drink at least one diet soda a day are 43 percent more likely to experience a “vascular event”—i.e., strokes and heart attacks—than people who drink none.

    But crucially, this study accounted for factors like weight, diabetes, high blood pressure, and intake of calories, cholesterol, and sodium, study author and University of Miami epidemiologist Hannah Gardener told me in a phone conversation. In other words, nonoverweight diet soda drinkers showed significantly more risk of heart attack than nonoverweight people who don’t drink diet soda.

    The Manhattan results comes on the heels of other highly suggestive research showing an association between diet-soda consumption and type 2 (adult onset) diabetes and metabolic syndrome, a condition characterized by abdominal obesity, high blood pressure, and other factors.”
    http://motherjones.com/tom-philpott/2012/02/diet-soda-silent-killer