What Are the Stroke Warning Signs?

NBA All-Star Paul George with his mom, Paulette
NBA All-Star Paul George with his mom, Paulette

NBA All-Star Paul George was only 6-years-old when his mother Paulette suffered a stroke that left her practically bedridden for two years. Today, Paulette remains partially paralyzed on the left side of her body.

“I remember every moment of it,” said the Indiana Pacers swingman. “I was always there at hospital visits, right by her bed. When she got a hospital bed in our home, I would lay in my bed next to her. I want to make sure that everyone knows the warning signs for a stroke so they can quickly take action and give their loved ones the best chance for recovery.”

The pair has teamed up with the American Stroke Association and the Ad Council on a series of multimedia PSAs that teach the acronym F.A.S.T. for stroke: If you see (F)ace drooping, (A)rm weakness or (S)peech difficulty, it’s (T)ime to call 9-1-1.

Created pro bono by The Baiocco and Maldari Connection, the new PSAs blend images of a 6-year-old George with the present-day athlete.

An American suffers a stroke every 40 seconds, but only 8 percent of the population knows what F.A.S.T. means, according to a recent Ad Council study.

The Ad Council’s new TV, radio, digital, and print PSAs will be distributed and run in space and time donated by the media.

“Learning the F.A.S.T. acronym is easy to do and may save a life,” said Lisa Sherman, Ad Council president and CEO. “We’re thrilled to work with American Stroke Association and Paul George to teach people the signs of a stroke so more families like Paul’s can have memories together.”

RMN News

Rakesh Raman