How a Female Foal is Named Hope

She’s 21 days old, already weighs 200 pounds and starred in a Super Bowl XLVII commercial for Budweiser. And now she has a name: “Hope,” a nod to the optimism and happy ending of the commercial where a trainer reunites with the horse he raised from a foal.

Last week Budweiser asked its Facebook fans and Twitter followers to send along naming suggestions. It says it got more than 60,000 tweets, Facebook comments, calls and direct messages. “Hope” was one of the more popular female names generated through the social media crowd-sourcing.

“We were overwhelmed with the response we got,” said Lori Shambro, brand director for Budweiser. “Budweiser fans suggested a lot of great names, and it was a tough decision, but we landed on Hope as the perfect name for this friendly, slightly feisty and just perfect Budweiser Clydesdale mare. Many of our fans wanted a name to reflect their optimism and spirit, which the name Hope encapsulates beautifully.”

Other popular names submitted included Landslide (after the Fleetwood Mac song in the commercial), Buddy, Star, Raven, Spirit and Stevie.

[ Also Read: How McDonald’s Did a Burger-Crowdsourcing Campaign ]

On Super Bowl Sunday on Feb. 3, the Budweiser Clydesdales appeared in a 60-second spot, “Brotherhood,” which chronicled the bond a Clydesdale foal shares with his trainer.

Budweiser also has just released an extended version of “Brotherhood,” with a running time of just under two minutes.

Budweiser, an American-style lager, was introduced in 1876 when company founder Adolphus Busch set out to create a truly national beer brand in the United States.

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