NASA to Take First Look Deep Inside Mars

NASA has selected a new mission, set to launch in 2016, that will take the first look into the deep interior of Mars to see why the Red Planet evolved so differently from Earth as one of solar system’s rocky planets. NASA made this announcement Monday, August 20.

The new mission, named InSight, will place instruments on the Martian surface to investigate whether the core of Mars is solid or liquid like Earth’s and why Mars’ crust is not divided into tectonic plates that drift like Earth’s.

Detailed knowledge of the interior of Mars in comparison to Earth will help scientists understand better how terrestrial planets form and evolve.

[ Also Read: Is Mars a Habitable Place for Humans? ]

“The exploration of Mars is a top priority for NASA, and the selection of InSight ensures we will continue to unlock the mysteries of the Red Planet and lay the groundwork for a future human mission there,” NASA administrator Charles Bolden said. “The recent successful landing of the Curiosity rover has galvanized public interest in space exploration and today’s announcement makes clear there are more exciting Mars missions to come.”

InSight will be led by W. Bruce Banerdt at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif. InSight’s science team includes U.S. and international co-investigators from universities, industry and government agencies.

[ Also Read: NASA 3-D App to Experience Robotic Space Travel ]

The French space agency Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales, or CNES, and the German Aerospace Center, or DLR, are contributing instruments to InSight, which is scheduled to land on Mars in September 2016 to begin its two-year scientific mission.

InSight will carry four instruments. JPL will provide an onboard geodetic instrument to determine the planet’s rotation axis and a robotic arm and two cameras used to deploy and monitor instruments on the Martian surface.

CNES is leading an international consortium that is building an instrument to measure seismic waves traveling through the planet’s interior. The German Aerospace Center is building a subsurface heat probe to measure the flow of heat from the interior.

Photo courtesy: NASA / Lockheed Martin

Related posts:


Victoria’s Secret Pink Playing with NFL
Tommy Hilfiger Celebrates the 25th Anniversary
Disney Calling Teens for Dreamers Academy Event
Is Divided Government Good for America?
Six Flags Over Texas Opens the Texas Giant
Victoria’s Secret Angel Reveals $2.5 Million Fantasy Bra
New Dodge Dart GT Model Ready to Roll Out
“Nevada: A World Within. A State Apart”
Top 11 Entertainment Web Series of 2013
Ban Ki-moon Urges to End Conflict in South Sudan
Custom Content Services