South Sudan Facing ‘Catastrophic’ Food Insecurity

A mother holds her severely malnourished 22-month-old baby in the Al Sabah children's hospital in Juba, South Sudan, while awaiting treatment at the UNICEF-supported nutrition ward. Photo: UNICEF / Albert González Farran
A mother holds her severely malnourished 22-month-old baby in the Al Sabah children’s hospital in Juba, South Sudan, while awaiting treatment at the UNICEF-supported nutrition ward. Photo: UNICEF / Albert González Farran

The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) says that it is responding to a growing food security emergency causing malnutrition in children in both rural and urban areas of crisis-gripped South Sudan.

“The situation in South Sudan is catastrophic, and even more so for children,” UNICEF spokesperson Christophe Boulierac told a news briefing in Geneva.

He also pointed out that so far this year, the agency has treated 120,000 children under age five for severe malnutrition; a nearly 50 per cent increase over the same period in 2015.

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Initially, UNICEF had been planning to provide support to 166,000 children in 2016, but that figure has been revised to more than 250,000, he added.

Seven out of the country’s 10 states have reached the malnutrition-rate-emergency threshold of 15 per cent, while in Northern Bahr el Ghazal, the malnutrition rate stands at 33 per cent, he explained.

UNICEF has also noted a sharp rise in malnutrition in South Sudan’s urban areas, including the capital, Juba, where the rates of children admitted for malnutrition to UNICEF-supported Al-Sabbah children’s hospitals were some 20 per cent higher in the first six months of 2016 than for the same period last year.

The spokesperson cited the country’s inflation rate as one of the main reasons for the high increase, explaining that it made basic household staples too expensive for many families.

Photo / Video courtesy: UNICEF

RMN News

Rakesh Raman